• What’s the quantitative section structure?
  • How many questions should I solve?
  • Can I see sample questions?

Welcome to Ofek Prep – the best online GMAT tutoring! On this site you’ll find a vast pool of math exercises (GMAT math prep). Updated GMAT materials that will help you reach top scores. GMAT sample questions – click here The quantitative section’s structure The quantitative section of the GMAT contains 37 questions. Each question has 5 answer choices, of which only one answer is correct. You cannot skip a question without answering it and you cannot go back to a question once you have answered, due to the adaptive nature of the test.

The duration of the quantitative section is 75 minutes, without internal division of time for the questions. This means that you need to manage your time and decide how much time to invest in each question (note: matters such as time management during the test are extremely important in an adaptive test like the GMAT and may impact your score significantly).
The quantitative section of the GMAT exam requires intermediate quantitative skills. Beyond these abilities, in order to succeed in the test, you need to show good logical and analytical skills. The difficulty in the GMAT stems from the complex wording of the questions.  Most of the difficult questions are more similar to logic riddles than to regular mathematics problems.

The following chart shows a map of the question types in the quantitative section of the GMAT: gmat math prep The precise number of questions of each subject can vary between the tests. Question formats in the quantitative section: For each subject, the questions in the quantitative section of the GMAT can be presented in one of two formats: Problem Solving or Data Sufficiency. Problem Solving (PS): This is the ‘regular’ and familiar question format, in which a calculation question is presented. We have to choose one of the answer choices that provides a solution to the question. During the GMAT math prep will see many questions of this kind. Data Sufficiency (DS): In this kind of GMAT problems, we are presented with a question that there is no way of answering. We will then be shown two statements containing data and additional information, an we will need to determine whether the information in this data allows us to answer the question. In GMAT DS questions, the answer choices are invariable. They are always: (A)   Statement (1) ALONE is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (2) ALONE is not. (B)    Statement (2) ALONE is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (1) ALONE is not. (C)    Statements (1) and (2) taken together are sufficient to answer the question, even though neither statement alone is sufficient. (D)   Either statement by itself is sufficient to answer the question. (E)    Statements (1) and (2) taken together are not sufficient to answer the question, and additional data are needed to answer the question. As you can see, this format adds additional difficulty to the subjects on which the questions are based. Therefore it’s very important to work methodically and thoroughly when solving DS questions in the GMAT. During our GMAT math prep we’ll show you the most efficient techniques. The following flowchart shows how to start solving DS format questions in the GMAT: GMAT_DS_QUESTIONS An example of a Data Sufficiency problem in the quantitative section of the GMAT: A store owner bought Q windows at a price of $150 per window and W shelves at a price of $75 per shelf. What is the total cost of the windows and shelves that he bought?

(1) The Q windows cost $600
(2) Q+W/2=12

(A)   Statement (1) ALONE is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (2) ALONE is not. (B)    Statement (2) ALONE is sufficient to answer the question, but statement (1) ALONE is not. (C)    Statements (1) and (2) taken together are sufficient to answer the question, even though neither statement alone is sufficient. (D)   Either statement by itself is sufficient to answer the question. (E)    Statements (1) and (2) taken together are not sufficient to answer the question, and additional data are needed to answer the question. As aforesaid, in DS questions, we don’t need to provide an answer to the presented question, but rather determine if there is sufficient data to answer it. We will begin by analyzing the question: it is possible to write the question as an equation: 150Q+75W=? Or, if we take out the common factor (75), the refined question will be: 2Q+W=? Notice that we are not asked for the value of Q or W (though, of course, if we knew that, we could have solved the question). Let’s check the data: The first statement tells us the value of Q but tells us nothing about W. Insufficient. The second data tells us that Q + W/2 = 12 and if we multiply this equation by 2, we will get 2Q+W=24, meaning, an answer to our question. Sufficient. Because the first statement wasn’t sufficient and the second one was, the answer is B. Looking for GMAT math prep? Would you like to see more questions and ways of solving them? Click here to practice dozens of questions (with detailed explanations) for FREE. GMAT score – the quantitative section The GMAT quantitative score ranges from 6 to 51, and it reflects your abilities, as they were calculated by the adaptive algorithm of the test. The following chart shows the percentiles of the quantitative scores in the GMAT exam: GMAT_Quantitative-Percentiles What does the GMAT score mean? Let’s look at an example:  A quantitative score of 50 is in the 89th percentile, meaning that 89% of the examines who took the GMAT test worldwide in the last three years (almost one million people) got less than 50. What’s the next step? SIGN UP NOW for online GMAT tutoring (GMAT math prep) or Fill out your details in the form to the left and one of our expert GMAT instructors will contact you.

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