Sentence correction (SR) questions can dramatically influence your score in the verbal section. They test your ability to precisely identify the original meaning of a sentence and then define how best to convey that meaning. These questions require a high level of control in English grammar and English for business, in addition to excellent analytical skills.

Each test contains approximately 15 SR questions.

SC questions begin with a short text, part of which is underlined (the entire text could be underlined or just a small part of it). You are required to check if there is a grammatical error or a mistake in the wording or phrasing, and choose the best way to re-write the text out of the possible answers. The first possible answer always repeats what is written in the question and we choose this answer if we think there are no mistakes. Obviously, there is no need to re-read the first answer option again and in this way we can save some precious time in the test.

Sentence Correction example in the verbal section of the GMAT:

According to cognitive-science theory, data is received through the senses, analyzed, stored, recoded, and is subsequently used in various ways; these activities are called information processes.

A. data is received through the senses, analyzed, organized, modified, and is subsequently used in diverse ways, these actions are termed information processes.

B. data received through the senses is analyzed, organized, modified, and subsequently used in diverse ways, and these are termed information processes.

C. data are received through the senses, are analyzed, organized, modified, and subsequently are used in diverse ways, actions termed information processes.

D. data received through the senses are analyzed, organized, modified, and subsequently used in diverse ways and such actions like these are termed information processes.

E. data received through the senses are analyzed, organized, modified, and subsequently used in diverse ways; these actions are termed information processes.

Answer and explanations:
A. The list, “analyzed, organized, modified” is missing an “and” before the last item in the list.  “Data” is plural (a ‘datum’ is the singular) and requires a plural verb, “are”.
B. “Data” is plural (a ‘datum’ is the singular) and requires a plural verb, “are”. “These” is missing a referent.
C. The list, “analyzed, organized, modified” is missing an “and” before the last item in the list.  “Data” is plural (a ‘datum’ is the singular) and requires a plural verb, “are”.  The modifier, “actions…” does not clearly and logically modify any part of the sentence.
D. There should be a comma before “and such actions…” to separate the two independent clauses.  The phrase, “such actions like” is unidiomatic and should be “such… as”.
E. Correct.

Do you want to practice more SC questions? Click here to practice with free example questions. All the questions come with detailed explanations and personal statistics.

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